urx unit loader Singer Pink leads the pack against Sarah Palin


In 2006 Pink challenged the policies of George W. Bush in her song "Dear Mr. President."

How can you say
No child is left behind?
We’re not dumb and we’re not blind.

Now Pink has a few words for Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, John McCain‘s VP choice.

"If I were writing a letter to Sarah Palin," Pink told PopEater this week, "it would be a lot of whys and hows. Who are you? Do you know? Why do you hate animals? Please point out Iraq on a map."

What scares Pink are women who believe that Palin’s pick is a victory for modern women.

"This woman hates women," Pink said. "She is not a feminist. She is not the woman that’s going to come behind Hillary Clinton and do anything that Hillary Clinton would’ve been capable of…. I can’t imagine overturning Roe vs. Wade. She’s not of this time. The woman terrifies me."

The outspoken singer and animal rights activist also believes that natural wildlife should be worried.

(Some background on Palin’s controversial policies in Alaska that Pink is opposed to after the jump….)

]]>Wolf_30_bigAccording to Slate, in 2007, Palin proposed that the state pay hunters $150 for the foreleg of every wolf gunned down by aerial hunting (meaning they’re shot by hunters in low-flying helicopters or small planes).

Animal rights activists — particularly Defenders of Wildlife, which released a 527 ad on Friday about the controversial policy (see the video below) — say this method of hunting is inhumane.

According to the Wolf Conservation Center, "Alaska is the only state in the U.S. where private trophy hunters can use aircraft to gun down wolves from low-flying planes or chase them to exhaustion, then land and shoot them at point-blank range."

Because of these concerns and others, Congress passed the Federal Airborne Hunting Act of 1972, making it illegal for hunters to shoot animals from a plane or helicopter.

But Alaska uses a loophole covering "predator control," Slate notes. Wolves, foxes and coyotes can be gunned down to protect "land, water, wildlife, livestock, domesticated animals, humans or crops."

Since 2003, Alaska has issued aerial wolf-hunting permits in areas where moose and caribou populations are endangered. Today’s aerial killers are unpaid, unlike in the past, but they can make money by selling the slaughtered animals’ fur.

(Hmmm. Couldn’t possibly involve celebrity fur lovers Sharon Stone or Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, right?)

"I can’t imagine shooting a wolf out of a helicopter," Pink says.

Me neither. Can you? Tell us in the comments below.

Photos (Pink and Palin): WireImage
Photo (wolves):

Note: The video below was created by Defenders of Wildlife, a U.S.-based nonprofit named America’s best wildlife charity by Reader’s Digest in 2005, and an organization that has been involved in conserving wolf populations in Alaska for 30 years. Be advised that the video is a disturbing account of a brutal act.