24_Mary-Lynn_Rajskub.jpgToday’s cuppa: World Market House Blend coffee

On “24,” airing Mondays on Fox — Is this the last season? Is the show hopping to NBC? Is it riding into the sunset or onto the big screen? As of this instant, the answers are, “Don’t know,” “Don’t know,” “Don’t know” and “Maybe.” We now return to your regularly scheduled blog post, already in progressMary-Lynn Rajskub plays CTU analyst Chloe O’Brian, who balances a plethora of computer skills with a dearth of social skills.

But Chloe does have a love life, and right now, that centers around husband Morris and their 4-year-old child. Since Morris has lost his job, Chloe has come back to the Counter Terrorist Unit — this time in New York City instead of Los Angeles — and is once again proving indispensable to saving the world.

In real life, Rajksub also has a husband and a son, Valentine, whom she sometimes brings to set.

Asked if she’s enjoying motherhood, Rajskub says, “I am. I had a really hard time with it the first three or four months. I was not enjoying it at all. It’s a huge life adjustment. I got a one-woman show out of that period of time, a good stand-up — half stand-up/half-storytelling one-woman show about not liking my baby. It’s pretty funny.”

After all, while a parent may love the child, the actual parenting thing may be less than a complete joy at times, especially during the early days.

“I’m glad I wrote stuff down during that period of time,”
Rajskub says, “because all the cliches are true. Everybody says, ‘It gets better, it gets better.’ And I remember being so angry, like, ‘F–k you, this sucks.’ And it really goes, it gets better and better.

“Now it’s to the point where I’m like, ‘I love him. He’s the greatest.’
But to know how hard it is, and to have to admit to yourself what you’re
not supposed to say, (which is) that this stinks.”

As for Chloe’s stressful day, Rajksub says, “As the sh-t hits the fan more and more, my character completely breaks out of everything … I’m trying to say it without spoiling. I’m put in a position to act differently than we’ve ever seen before.

“Towards the end of the season, this is probably the most major turn that my character’s taken, but you won’t see it until towards the end of the season. This is like, there’s no going back.

“I don’t mean to be so dramatic. I don’t turn into an evil monster or anything. It’s believable. I don’t think, after all these years, that I would become a mole, but I’m forced to make some pretty big choices.”