Bert and Ernie on 'The New Yorker' cover after Supreme Court DOMA ruling

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What are Bert and Ernie doing on the cover of "The New Yorker"?

The magazine usually has a cover that relates closely to the social events of the time. So it's no surprise that the magazine would focus on the Supreme Court's decision to end the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). The inclusion of "Sesame Street" characters Bert and Ernie is just a bit of a surprise.

Why these two felt creatures? For years now, adult viewers of "Sesame Street" have theorized that the two roommates were meant to be gay. That, mixed with the inclusive nature of the SCOTUS ruling, makes the use of these happy, loving characters perfect for cover art.

This is not to say that Ernie and Bert are gay lovers/partners/roommates. "Sesame Street" has always been careful to state that the relationship between two of the show's most popular Muppets is purely platonic. In 2011, the children's show made an explicit statement on the matter via Facebook:

"Bert and Ernie are best friends. They were created to teach preschoolers that people can be good friends with those who are very different from themselves. Even though they are identified as male characters and possess many human traits and characteristics (as most 'Sesame Street' Muppets do), they remain puppets, and do not have a sexual orientation."

Whatever the case, it's likely that two creatures as good-hearted and all-welcoming as Bert and Ernie would be happy about the Supreme Court's ruling.

Photo/Video credit: The New Yorker
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