Bill O'Reilly on 'Killing Kennedy,' Rob Lowe and Chris Christie's possible presidential run

bill-oreilly-rob-lowe-killing-kennedy.jpg Bill O'Reilly appeared on "CBS This Morning" Friday (Nov. 8) where he talks about his book series that includes "Killing Kennedy," which is airing as a film on NatGeo Sunday, Nov. 10.

O'Reilly says that Rob Lowe, who plays President John F. Kennedy in the movie, does a good job.

"Yeah, he's good. Very tough accent to do, but even more impressive to me than the accent was the body language. Kennedy had a patrician bearing, a rich guy," says O'Reilly. "When you're raised in wealth in America you carry yourself a little bit differently, and Lowe, who wasn't a wealthy guy, he's a Midwestern guy, got it. I was very impressed with how Lowe handled the whole thing."

O'Reilly also talks about focus the book and film, which is the infamous assassination of the 35th president on Nov. 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas.

"There was no conspiracy of a magnitude where there were other gunmen. ... J. Edgar Hoover, the FBI chief, wanted there to be a conspiracy, that's the key to my book and the whole thing, because then he could control the investigation," says O'Reilly. "Most people don't know the Dallas police department controlled the whole investigation because it wasn't a federal crime, it was a murder ... and they messed up big time, so Hoover sent 80 agents down with orders to 'Find a conspiracy. Find it so I can run this,' and they couldn't."

Turning to the current political landscape, O'Reilly says that New Jersey Governor Chris Christie may be the guy for the Republican party -- if they don't run too far to the right in the primaries.

"Look, the Republican party needs to win," says O'Reilly. "Sure, there are going to be right-wing people that don't vote for him [in a primary], but I think if you are a Republican that you're going to have to field somebody to beat Hillary Clinton and certainly Chris Christie can give Hillary Clinton a run."

O'Reilly adds, though, that Christie needs to be more in the national spotlight before he can consider a presidential run.

"He's an impatient man and in the national spotlight, that's going to hurt him. He won't submit to an interview with me. ... He just won't do it, so I can't tell you policy-wise how versed he is because I've never seen him under that spotlight. He's going to have to get under it, whether it's me or somebody else," says O'Reilly.

Photo/Video credit: Getty Images
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