'Heroes' is returning: 7 other shows NBC should bring back from the dead

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After the surprising news that "Heroes" will be coming back with a 13-episode event series titled "Heroes Reborn," it's game on for bringing shows back from the dead. After all, does anyone remember what "Heroes" was like toward the end of its original run? Not exactly something you'd be itching to see brought back to life.

With that in mind, here are five shows we would love to see revived and given a bit of an updated spin by NBC, be it by remake or continuation.

'My Two Dads'

This time around, it's about a gay couple who, back in college, when they were both still in the closet, slept with the same woman. Now said woman has died and left her 13-year-old daughter to this couple that is used to their lives as fashionable DINKs (double income, no kids) -- but which one is the father. Dick Butkus can reprise his role as the bartender at the restaurant under their trendy NYC loft. Stacey Keenan can play the judge. 

'Freaks and Geeks: Class Reunion'

It's 2002, and Lindsay Weir is returning to Michigan for her 20-year reunion at McKinley High. Younger brother Sam is also home for the weekend, as their dad, Harold, is ailing. Flashbacks reveal what happened after Lindsay took off with Kim Kelly in the series finale, and that while she eventually returned to the straight and narrow path, she retains a rebellious streak -- particularly when she sees old friends Kim, Daniel, Nick and Ken again. Sam catches up with Neal (rebuilding his life after losing a fortune in the dotcom bubble) and Bill (who's now a successful TV writer).

'ER 2015'

The series finale of "ER" focused in part on a new intern played by Alexis Bledel and Mark Greene's daughter, Rachel ( Hallee Hirsh). Boom: Six years later, they are your worldly-wise residents showing a new group of interns the ropes. Possibilities for guest spots and cameos from previous cast members abound.

'Sunset Division'

In the early 2000s, back when NBC was riding high, "Crossing Jordan" was a solid performer for the network -- solid enough that the network and series creator Tim Kring (yep, the man behind "Heroes") put together a potential spinoff that followed Detective Woody Hoyt ( Jerry O'Connell) to L.A. for a case with the impossibly slick-even-for-TV-cops Sunset Division. Bonus: Kring co-wrote the episode with future "Lost" co-creator Damon Lindelof.

'The New Golden Girls'

Can you imagine Blanche Deveraux in the age of the Internet and online dating? The beauty of "Golden Girls" is that while it primarily aired in the '80s, the jokes and comedic timing of the stars still works. It's time to draft a new group of older actresses to tickle the world's funny bone. Besides, inappropriate jokes are way more acceptable when they come from someone who could be your grandmother.

'Family Ties'

Since "The Michael J. Fox Show" is pretty much done, the time is right for Alex P. Keaton to come back to life. Whereas the original "Family Ties" found him growing up a Republican in a liberal household, the continuation will find the conservative raising liberal children with his artist wife, former college girlfriend Ellen (Fox's real life wife Tracy Pollan). Think of the show as "American Dad," but live action and actually funny, without talking animals and aliens.

'ALF: The Return'

ALF comes back to Earth, but this time it becomes clear that Gordon Shumway is merely the advance guard of an invading force from Melmac. Can humanity and the feline world work together to push back the aliens for the good of Earth?
Photo/Video credit: NBC
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