'Klondike's' Richard Madden gained 'cuts, bruises and strength'

richard-madden-klondike-discovery-newscom-325.jpgZap2it : Was there more of a code of honor in the 1890s, when this was set?

Richard Madden : I think within certain men, definitely, within (his character) Bill Haskell, 100 percent. After Byron was shot, he wants to take that man home to his family. That is the honorable thing to do.

Zap2it : Haskell seems more about finding his friend's murderer and avenging his death than the reason everyone else is up there -- gold. What is his motivation?

Richard Madden: His motivation, for me, I realized toward the end of filming -- he went up there with this idea of the world, and it gets pushed and challenged when his friend is shot so unjustly and so mysteriously. It destroys his image of the world being such a good place, and brilliant things can happen. And that is a big thing of trying to solve the problem of who shot Epstein, then the world can go back to being a really good place, and solving that murder does not help the illusion; solving that murder makes him realize the world is a different place. The driving factor for him is he wants to solve the death of his friend, and it is almost like trying to reclaim his innocence.

Zap2it : What did you take away from this role?

Richard Madden : Cuts and bruises. I took away a strength. He gets stronger as the piece goes on, when actually he should be getting weaker. The more you push someone, the more it forces you to decide what kind of person you are.
Photo/Video credit: Newscom
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