'Opposite Worlds' combines 'Big Brother' with 'The Hunger Games'

luke-tipple-opposite-worlds-syfy-newscom-325.jpg"The Hunger Games" meets "Big Brother" on "Opposite Worlds," a new competitive reality series premiering Tuesday, Jan. 21, on Syfy. Luke Tipple, who served a similar function in last summer's CW game show "Capture," hosts the 12-episode series, which airs each Tuesday and Wednesday, the latter episodes live.

"Opposite Worlds" revolves around 14 players who are divided randomly into two teams, each living in an extreme environment that replicates a given time frame.

"One is in a futuristic type environment, while the other is living in much more of a Stone Age environment, but they're separated only by one glass wall, so they can see each other, see how the other half lives," explains Brant Pinvidic, one of the show's executive producers to Zap2it. "Each week they'll be competing for where they will fit in the game, battling to live on whichever side they want to be. It's a really interesting social experiment in how your living environment affects how you play the game both socially and physically. You have to make smart social decisions: Do you stick with the team you feel a connection with, or are you more desperate to live in more comfort?"

Adding an interactive component to the game, viewers at home during the Wednesday live episode can go online and have a direct effect on the proceedings.

"We've been working with the digital and social guys at Syfy since the inception of the show, to incorporate the viewing audience at home on almost every level," Pinvidic says. "They can influence the rewards and punishments a favorite player receives, and like in 'The Hunger Games,' they can actually send stuff in to the players during the live show."

Pinvidic adds that the wild-card nature of the live challenges are a bit nerve-racking.

"We're dealing with contestants who are in a very extreme environment, who have been cut off from the rest of the world. They've become very focused on their task, so when you ask them to do challenges live, anything can and usually does happen," he says.
Photo/Video credit: Newscom
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