Robin Thicke's 'Blurred Lines' music video: Are you still mad?

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Plenty of pop-culture stories from 2013 were fodder for public outrage. As the year comes to a close, Zap2it takes a look back at some of the biggest uproars and asks: U Still Mad?

It was undoubtedly the song of the summer, but the accompanying video for Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines" perhaps made more noise than the song ever could.

Thicke and his comrades Pharrell Williams and T.I. dropped their video on March 20, in which a handful of naked women paraded around the dudes in their full suits. Immediately, the clip sparked a media firestorm, with a great many critics speaking up and pointing out the misogynistic undertones overtones of the video. By singing lyrics like "I know you want it" while making a show out of the naked women, Thicke developed a growing opposition who believed his song and video were making light of sexual consent, promoting rape culture.

Riding high on the charts while facing the firing squad at every turn put Thicke on the defensive about the biggest song of his career. During a visit to the "Today" show, he said the conversation surrounding the song was intended. "It's actually a feminist moment within itself," he said. "It's saying that women and men are equals as animals and as power."

Then, in a May interview with GQ, Thicke explained away the video this way: "We tried to do everything that was taboo. Bestiality, drug injections, and everything that is completely derogatory towards women. Because all three of us are happily married with children, we were like, 'We're the perfect guys to make fun of this.' People say, 'Hey, do you think this is degrading to women?' I'm like, 'Of course it is. What a pleasure it is to degrade a woman. I've never gotten to do that before. I've always respected women.' So we just wanted to turn it over on its head and make people go, 'Women and their bodies are beautiful. Men are always gonna want to follow them around.'"

Now that so much time has passed since the release of the controversial video, we've got to ask: Are you still mad about it? Or are you on Thicke's side? Or are you just hoping talk of "Blurred Lines" stays in the past?
Photo/Video credit: Fair Use
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