'Skins': Like Cadie, we're happy, well, happier

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We have to give our readers some credit for telling us we should tune into MTV's "Skins" this week when we were ready to give up after the last episode. That's not to say we're 100 percent onboard after last week's disappointment, but this episode goes a long way to making us feel happy, well, happier.

Here's the good part. We liked the tone of this episode, cinematic at times. There's a fast cut editing style that's everywhere nowadays (even on The History Channel), which originated with MTV. It was that fast cutting that helped to label a generation as victims of ADD. The editing of this episode broke from that tradition with long still shots, pans and zooms. For a change, we could breathe and really get inside Cadie's (played by Britne Oldford) k-hole of a mind. We wouldn't be surprised if some were bored by the first half of this episode, because we're so used to continual movement in today's entertainment.

The other good news is that we like Cadie the character. She's all kinds of nuts with several levels of psychosis going on to match her multiple psychiatrists. Her parents are self-centered and don't really hear her. Her friends don't recognize her absence unless they need something from her. And what does she want? It's cliché, but she just wants to be liked for something other than her access to pills, her looks, and for sex - she wants to be liked for being her (groan, we know, but it's what we got from her). We know lots of teen girls who will relate to her feelings stemming from her loneliness, being misunderstood and for being treated like a trophy.

Now, all that praise doesn't come with some criticism. We remain impervious to Tony's ( James Newman) charms, which makes it hard to believe that he can lead this group of ne'er-do-wells let alone keep an entire city of teens believing he's cool. This actor still hasn't convinced us. And we still believe Tony's feelings for lesbian Tea ( Sophia Black-D'Elia) is one of the biggest copouts of the series and doubly offends our intelligence.

Either way, this episode brought our attention back. And since it was supposedly the first episode written by the New York team, it gives us some hope that the level of storytelling around Cadie may continue with the other characters in the remaining episodes.

Did "Cadie" win you over?
Photo/Video credit: MTV
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