'Supernatural' recap: Dean makes another deal, but with the devil this time

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Oh, Dean. What have you done?

The elder Winchester made another rash deal on Tuesday (Jan. 21) night's "Supernatural." However, unlike last time when his deal was with an angel -- regardless of the fact that it turned out to be the worst angel in the history of the world -- this time he made a deal with the devil. More specifically, the father of murder, a.k.a. Cain ("Psych's" Timothy Omundson).

So how did Dean become bosom buddies with the ultimate baddie of biblical proportions? First, he became best buds with Crowley. No, we're serious. Crowley came to Dean for help in defeating Abaddon, because the only weapon that can kill a knight of hell is the First Blade. They follow its trail to Cain -- of Cain and Abel -- who apparently scares Crowley like nothing we've ever seen before (his hands were shaking!).

Crowley tells Dean the "Supernatural" version of the story of Cain and Abel: After Cain killed Abel, he became a demon, the deadliest demon to ever walk the face of the earth. He even trained the knights of hell, Abaddon included, but he was also the one who slaughtered them all (minus Abaddon).

Cain is less than thrilled that he was found after he "retired," so he tells Dean and Crowley the true story of why he became the father of murder. Turns out Cain only killed his brother to save Abel's soul. Abel was being corrupted by Lucifer, so Cain made a deal that if he killed Abel, Abel's soul would go to heaven and Cain would be sent to hell. That's when he became the founder of the knights of hell. But then he fell in love, got married, and stopped killing and "retired" for his wife's sake. The knights of hell then kidnapped his wife to draw him back in, so that's when he murdered all of them -- but not before Abaddon killed his wife.

After Dean proves himself a worthy fighter to Cain by dispatching a ton of demons who were on their tail (seriously, how epic was that fight? Dean's the most hardcore hunter in the history of ever), Cain tells Dean that along with the First Blade, he'll need the special Mark of Cain to kill Abaddon. Cain transfers the mark from himself over to Dean (with the promise that Dean will kill him after he kills Abaddon) and tells him the blade is at the bottom of the deepest ocean. Along with the blade, the mark has the ability to kill Abaddon, but it also comes with a "great burden." But Dean, in a hurry, doesn't wait to find out the fine print. Uh oh, what has he gotten himself into?

You'd think after agreeing to Sam's angelic possession without all the details -- like the fact that the angel wasn't Ezekiel, but the villainous Gadreel -- would have stopped Dean from making another deal knowing all the details. But these Winchesters never learn, do they?

Crowley tells Dean that he'll scour the bottoms of the oceans to find the blade and will bring to him when he does, but Dean confronts him. He noticed Crowley wasn't helping him kill the demons that attacked him. Turns out Crowley was playing him the whole time, and wasn't scared at all of Cain. He just knew that Cain wouldn't give the mark or blade to Crowley, so he needed Dean to prove himself to Cain. Here's the king of hell we all know and love to hate. He was acting just a liiiiiittle too buddy-buddy the entire episode, so at least we know our suspicions were correct.

While Dean was on his mission with Crowley, Sam and Cas were on a case of their own in the Men of Letter bunker. While Cas was healing the last of Sam's injuries, he feels something inside of Sam. Turns out, Sam has a little angelic grace left inside of him from Gadreel's possession. If Cas can extract it, they can then use it to track Gadreel.

But the process almost kills Sam -- his body starts regressing back to how it was before Gadreel possessed him -- and when Cas tries to stop, Sam begs him to continue. He says his life isn't worth more than anyone else's, a.k.a. Kevin, and it becomes clear that both Winchesters are blaming themselves for the prophet's death. But Cas tells him that nothing is worth losing Sam. After his time spent as a human, Cas realized that the ends don't justify the means anymore.

Cas uses what little grace he could extract to try the tracking spell, but there wasn't enough grace to make the spell work. Anyone else get the feeling that Cas was lying about getting all the grace out of Sam? Maybe he just didn't want the younger Winchester to kill himself in the process. After the most awkward hugs in the history of hugs (seriously, didn't Cas learn how to hug when he was a human?) he tells Sam that Metatron is the key to fixing everything.

The juxtaposition of Cas telling Sam that they "need all the help they can get to defeat Metatron" and Crowley telling Dean they "need all the help they can get to defeat Abaddon" was eerie. Should we be reading into that? With Dean listening to the devil on his shoulder and Sam listening to the angel on his, methinks we're about to see some more conflict for the Winchester brothers in the future.

While the episode was amazing overall -- especially considering the Winchesters were separated for the entire duration -- it made us extremely worried for what's coming next. What does Dean's mark mean? Why did he just agree to another deal without thinking it through? Can we really trust Crowley? Is there any grace left in Sam? Has Cas' speech finally gotten Sam to stop trying to die for the greater good?

Also, poor Cas: He can't enjoy the taste of food anymore now that he's an angel again -- he can only taste the molecules. He misses PB&J!

"Supernatural" airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. ET on The CW.

Photo/Video credit: The CW
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